The Psychology Of Eating

THE PSYCHOLOGY OF EATING

Many of us have a complicated relationship with food.

We’re more in tune with our bodies when we are very young, but that changes as we get older, as we inherit or reject family and societal eating patterns and trends.

Our body changes through time, illness and disease can form, and all too often pain and trauma can be part of our life story.

Consequently, it is reasonably normal to struggle with disordered eating to some degree.

FEEL WELL

Tell us what is going on for you, and let us explain how we can help

PSYCHOLOGICAL FACTORS THAT AFFECT OUR EATING

Food is more than fuel, and we often eat when we are not hungry. We lose touch with our natural hunger and fullness signals, due to a variety of psychological and emotional factors.

Food feeds a range of emotions. Sometimes we can feel out of control of our eating, maybe bingeing or eating compulsively to feel a sense of comfort. This short-term numbing and distraction of our feelings, is often quickly followed by feelings of guilt, regret and shame.

Some of us may over-restrict our food intake, or place personal, unbreakable rules around what we eat. The more we try to control our eating (and fail), the less control we feel. Failing to live up to our high standards can activate a powerful inner critic, a voice that internally can leave us feeling worthless.

Daily stress around deadlines and expectations can add to the complexity of food consumption. Our modern world places high demands on our time, and healthy eating can end up taking second place to work and family.

We tend to eat on the run, and grab convenience foods that are high in sugar and carbs, but lack fibre and essential nutrients. Too often, we lack the time to cook real food from fresh ingredients. 

So, food can become a comfort, an escape, a convenience, a stress release, and an addiction. It doesn’t have to be.

THE PSYCHOLOGY OF EATING PROGRAMME

The psychology of eating is an integrated wellness programme combining psychological and nutritional support.

Our nutrition team will work with you to focus on what, when, where and how you are eating.

We understand that the psychological reasons for eating are as important as the physical ones.

It may be very beneficial to engage with psychotherapy to comprehend the “why” around your eating patterns and behaviours.

We can provide you with tools and support to help you make better food decisions.

We work alongside the therapy team at WeightMatters and EmotionMatters, both part of the HealthMatters Group.

This diverse team of counsellors, psychotherapists and clinical psychologists can provide a range of services to support your needs. 

BOOK AN ASSESSMENT CALL

Book a call with our friendly assessment team

HOW MUCH SUPPORT DO I RECEIVE ON THE PROGRAMME?

Below you can see the number of sessions you receive on the programme with both your therapist and nutritionist.

Nutrition Coaching

  • Free 15-minute connection call
  • 1 x 90-minute assessment session
  • 1 x 60-minute follow-up session
  • 2 x 40-minute follow-up sessions
  • 30-minutes report creation and email support

Psychotherapy

  • Free 30-minute discovery session
  • 6 x 50-minute weekly therapy sessions

Your nutritionist will work with your therapist to coach you through changes in your diet and lifestyle to support healthy eating, optimal nutrition and good mental health.

OUR PSYCHOLOGY OF EATING TEAM

HOW MUCH DOES THE PROGRAMME COST?

Our calculator below allows you to choose your therapist and nutritionist, at either standard or off-peak rates.

Off-peak therapy sessions start at 9.00, 9.30, 10.00 or 10.30am in the morning, and at 2.00, 3.00 and 4.00pm in the afternoon, Monday to Friday.

You save the most money by paying for the Psychology Of Eating Programme in full upfront.

If you prefer to spread the cost of the programme over 3 months, our payment plan costs just £50 more.

FIND OUT MORE ABOUT THE PSYCHOLOGY OF EATING

Here are some blogs from our sister websites that we think you may find interesting. They link psychological health with eating behaviour.